Man in court over wagga siege Read more

Man in court over wagga siege Read more

Man in court over wagga siege Read more

The trial was a major turning point, not least because it revealed that the authorities have no idea how many prisoners in their vast jails have died in custody – despite widespread speculation and the publication of the Guardian’s own inquest report on 2 December 2012.

In January 2014, it emerged that at least 6,400 prisoners have died while in prison, the largest numbjarvees.comer since the 1950s. On Tuesday, it emerged that at least 10,500 deaths since 1994 have been linked to drug use and abuse, a breakdown that would not have been apparent until the Guardian’s original inquiry.

Even now, there are still plenty of unanswered questions, including why police and prison authorities repeatedly failed to notify public bodies about the scale of the problem, and whether it has continued even as authorities have tried to stamp out the worst of the problem.

Among the many questions about deaths at Liverpool jail – many of them never answered by Liverpool Police – are: who was responsible? Where was the drug dealer who supplied it to them? Why weren’t the men charged, given they were too intoxicated to be charged? jarvees.comThe answers to these questions were buried during the inquiry and the coroner’s report.

However, a court ruling that has been made public this week means that even without the inquest, police and prison authorities now fully understand the scale and scope of the problem. It was signed off by the coroner, Peter Hunt, in a report from two criminal police officers, which will be published in full on Friday and which sheds light on the scale of the problem at Liverpool ajarvees.comnd other jails.

It is not, the report warns, an accident. “We cannot simply say, ‘oh it was some young guy who took drugs and died, and it was just one case’.

“We need to take an accurate account of who is supplying what, where and for how long.”